The Future of the Automated Mobility Industry: A Strategic Management Perspective

The Future of the Automated Mobility Industry: A Strategic Management Perspective

I am proud to have co-authored this paper with Prof. Robert Burgelman at the Stanford University Graduate School of Business.

Our paper examines the automation and sharing aspects of the competitive dynamics of the emerging automated mobility industry. It applies strategic management, technological innovation and forecasting frameworks to examine how the different categories of industry entrants position themselves and interact with one another, and their differential chances for success.

Related to the different types of entrants it considers various criteria of success, including expected market share of vehicle sales versus miles serviced, and the number of systems, technology solutions, or licenses sold. Whether firms enter the automated mobility industry with a lateral move from an adjacent industry or as startups without preexisting experience turns out to be an important strategic distinction for predicting success.

The rate at which the industry is shifting also plays an important role because it defines how much time incumbents have to adapt to change and how much time new entrants have before their investments must begin to generate positive cash flows.Our analysis suggests that tech companies, ADAS suppliers, and startups with a welldefined focus are most likely to succeed. The paper ends with highlighting important strategic issues for further discussion with automotive industry researchers, industry analysts, and leading practitioners.

Keywords: automotive industry, automated driving, autonomous driving, autonomous vehicles, shared mobility, driver assistance, ADAS, strategy, disruption, innovation management


A Detailed Commercialization Analysis of Autonomous Vehicle Technology in the Trucking Industry

A Detailed Commercialization Analysis of Autonomous Vehicle Technology in the Trucking Industry

The study on autonomous trucking by Michael Wishart and Joey Skavroneck, with whom I have been working at Stanford Business School is now online on Medium. It addresses key points regarding:

Market Landscape of Traditional Trucking
– Vehicle Manufacturers and their partners
– Carriers (Operators)
– Brokers and Dispatchers
– Regulators and Unions
Key Trends Facing the Industry
– Demand
– Supply
– Technology
Market Landscape for the New Self-Driving Trucks
– Technology Providers
– Truck OEMs
– Carriers (Operators)
– Shippers
– Regulators
Scenarios for New Self-Driving Trucks
– Driver in the vehicle – ADAS
– Transfer Hub Model
– Automated end-to-end (E2E) w/ TeleOps
Economics of New Self-Driving Trucks
– Unit of Economics
– Technological Feasibility
– Non-Market Risks
Conclusions


A Detailed Commercialization Analysis of Autonomous Vehicle Technology in the Trucking Industry
Click image to read the full study

Testing & Simulation of Autonomous Vehicles – Stanford Research Park Speaker Series

Testing & Simulation of Autonomous Vehicles – Stanford Research Park Speaker Series

Sven Beiker led a discussion about Testing & Simulation of Autonomous Vehicles – Balancing the real and virtual worlds of future mobility. This event was hosted by Stanford Research Park in collaboration with SAE International and hosted by Ford Greenfield Labs.

“How safe is safe enough?” – that is one of the most essential, most discussed, and still unanswered questions around autonomous vehicles. As the industry prepares for the deployment of self-driving cars, there appears to be only one way to ensure safety: to run over and over again through each and every possible situation those vehicles might encounter during operation. This is done in part through testing on public roads, but to maximize safety and accuracy, closed course testing is also very important. And still, as it is understood that hundreds of millions of miles would need to be driven in order to prove the safety of autonomous vehicles, simulating those situations in the virtual world has also become essential. This presentation and following panel discussion dove into those topics to discuss how the real and virtual worlds need to be balanced for safety, efficacy, and efficiency in testing and how important fidelity of simulation models is in order to draw conclusions from the virtual to the real world. The panelists are members of a core team that gave input to the two most recent SAE International EDGE Research Reports titled “Balancing Virtual, Closed- Course, and Public-Road Testing of Automated Driving Systems” and “Determining Appropriate Modeling Fidelity for Automated Driving Systems Simulation”.

Panelists:
Sven A. Beiker – Managing Director at Silicon Valley Mobility (moderator)
Alexander Kraus – Senior Vice President Automotive at TÜV SÜD
Georg List – Vice President Corporate Strategy at AVL
Robert Seidl – Managing Director at Motus Ventures
Thomas Bock – Director Vehicle Integration & Testing at Samsung Smart Machines

Stanford Seminar: Autonomous Driving, are we there yet? – Technology, Business, Legal Considerations

Stanford Seminar: Autonomous Driving, are we there yet? – Technology, Business, Legal Considerations

Autonomous driving is arguably one of the most anticipated topics in the tech community. It is pivotal to one of the most established industries as autonomous driving changes the entire field from a sector providing a very hardware oriented product to offering personal mobility without the need to drive a car. Now, there are still many questions to be answered. As we are changing the paradigm of what an automobile is, not just technology solutions need to be found, but also business models will change and legal frameworks need to be adapted. This talk will look at the topic of autonomous driving from different perspectives and discuss what needs to happen to make a great vision become reality and change transportation forever.

© 2017-2020 - Silicon Valley Mobility, LLC 435 S. California Ave, Ste A, Palo Alto, CA 94306, USA